On the Same Page: One Tip for Easing the Pain of Critique

Dylan Manning

Featured Image: Truman Capote, 1959 by Roger Higgins for the New York World-Telegram and the Sun via Wikimedia Commons. This image is in the public domain.


You’ve finished your short story,  painstakingly perfecting all twelve pages, and submitted it to your writing group to be workshopped. After weeks of apprehension, tonight is finally the night. You’re looking forward to the praise, congratulations, and encouragements you’re sure you are going to receive and perhaps a suggestion to submit your work to The New Yorker. You brace yourself for this cascade of compliments, taking a seat in the circle and nodding politely to your colleagues. “Don’t smile too much,” you tell yourself. “Be cool.” And then it starts. They smile and say they “liked it” and it “definitely had some parts worth reading” but overall it “needs some work” and “heavy editing” before it can be “considered for publication.”

You want to cry. You want to tell them how you really felt about all their pieces because all the times you thoughtfully critiqued their work you had really been holding back. You feel the urge to run away, rip up your piece, and never write again, regretting suddenly your decision not to go to med school or night school for automotive repair. You wish that you knew someone with real taste who could read it for you, really read it, and tell you that it’s a great piece of fiction and anybody who says otherwise doesn’t know a thing about writing.

They just told you your baby was ugly, and it hurt.

Continue reading “On the Same Page: One Tip for Easing the Pain of Critique”

Imagine Doing This All the Time: Support River River write! Community Salons

Guys. GUYS. Last Friday, River River had the BEST night. If you were there, you were probably transported to a new state of being, and want to support our online fundraiser without further rumination. If you weren’t there, read on. We’ll include the link again at the end of the post, we promise.

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Our reputation for organizing warm, open, and highly entertaining readings with local writers preceded us all the way to Georgia, where poet Nick Norwood, director of the Carson McCullers Center, was planning events for the celebrated author’s centennial. River River joined in the festivities planned for Nyack, Carson McCullers’ home for twenty years, where the author famously hosted many artists and musicians at her historic Broadway house.

The room was packed. As always, we began with an open mic to warm up the crowd for James Hoch, an award-winning local poet (Miscreants, 2007) who teaches at Ramapo College. We had a published novelist and veteran poet lining up for the open mic, right alongside regulars from our writing circles and starry-eyed newcomers. No line-jumping allowed! The welcoming grace of our community did the rest. The air was heavy and bright with words. Everyone left wanting more.

We want to give more, and keep giving it for a long time. Which is why it’s so important for us to reach our very modest goal of $1,600 through this online campaign.

We are growing! We are reaching an ever-widening circle of writers.

Over the last three months, River River Writers Circle has brought over 500 hours of low- to no-cost writing circles, readings, and workshops to a community of writers with all levels of experience, including:

  • up to three write! generative salons each week,
  • readings by contributors to our Journal and by award-winning poets and novelists, which
  • always feature open-mic readings from our writing circles, without regard for publication credits or other honors—all you need is five minutes’ worth of material and the will to stand up.

Wouldn’t it be great if we could do this ALL THE TIME? We think so! If you add up all of those hours (priceless, we know, but that never stopped anyone from trying to put a price on something really good), and multiply by, say, $10/hour, you’ll quickly understand why we need your help.

River River Writers Circle is surviving on less than minimum wage.

We are an official 501(c)(3) nonprofit. We need to raise about $1,600 so that potential grantors know that you guys believe in us. In return for your donation of as little as $5, you will be commemorated forever on the pages of River River Journal’s first-ever anthology, due for publication in 2018.

And of course, the perks evolve and beautify as your donation increases. Your donation could purchase editorial services for yourself or your favorite aspiring writer. You could have us print hand-bound, custom chapbooks of your selection of poetry. Or you could buy a ticket to our spring Lodestar reading. Check out the link for more information.

Keep us afloat in Nyack on this amazing river of words.