Prompt for August 7 – Virtual Barat House

You miss it when it’s gone.

Use the prompt to inspire your work in any form (poetry or prose; fiction of any genre; creative nonfiction, essay, or memoir).

Log into our virtual meeting at 1pm for readings and discussion.

If you prefer to post your work to our blog, visit Submittable after 12pm to upload your work. We will do our best to publish everything we receive.

This prompt was the title of an article by Bryan Washington in The New Yorker, June 1, 2020, a pre-social-distancing slice-of-life montage.

Prompt for August 5 – Virtual Didier Dumas

A storm in a storm

Dramatically, you’d call this “escalation.” Hurricane Isaias—or any major storm system—might offer a profound example to inspire your work, whether you think on a grand scale (a hurricane during a pandemic) or a smaller scale (a tornado during a tropical storm). Step out of reality into fantasy (a zombie attack during a domestic dispute) or twist the image into one of joy (a surprise ice cream party hosted by your crush after you win a balloon race).

Use the prompt to inspire your work in any form (poetry or prose; fiction of any genre; creative nonfiction, essay, or memoir).

Join our virtual meeting at 8pm for readings and discussion.

If you prefer to post your work to our blog, visit Submittable after 7pm to upload your work. We will do our best to publish everything we receive.

Prompt for July 31 – Virtual Barat House

Perseverance

Use the prompt to inspire your work in any form (poetry or prose; fiction of any genre; creative nonfiction, essay, or memoir).

Log into our virtual meeting at 1pm for readings and discussion.

If you prefer to post your work to our blog, visit Submittable after 12pm to upload your work. We will do our best to publish everything we receive.

A little more inspiration

“Perseverance” figured prominently in the news this week: as the theme for President Barack Obama’s eulogy for Representative John Lewis and in the NASA launch of Mars Perseverance Rover . The occurrences were completely independent of each other—President Obama did not relate Mr. Lewis’s work or persona to NASA’s mission (though his own journey was as remarkable), and NASA’s mission was named years ago (though long after the Freedom Riders demonstrated for Civil Rights).

Prompt for July 29 – Virtual Didier Dumas

Athena, is that you?

Sometimes the goddess is out. Sometimes you find a stranger in the sanctuary. Or maybe she’s come to your place, knocking at an unexpected hour, just to see how you’re doing. She doesn’t always dress the part.

Join our virtual meeting at 8pm for readings and discussion.

If you prefer to post your work to our blog, visit Submittable after 7pm to upload your work. We will do our best to publish everything we receive.

Deeper dive into the prompt . . .

“Naked Athena” caused a minor sensation when she appeared at the #BLM protests in Portland, Oregon, wearing nothing but a hat and a mask, and stood down a line of law enforcement wearing riot gear. In the Willamette Week she is quoted: “I just wanted them to see what they’re shooting at.” In the New York Times, Mitchell S. Jackson questioned the value of such Portlandesque “weirdness,” a mark of white privilege, in support of Black Lives Matter in Oregon, a state founded on the explicit exclusion of Black people. Cf. this piece by Shamontiel L. Vaughan, who acknowledges that naked yoga by a non-Black protester is “noise” for the Black Lives Matter movement, but also respects a woman “showing how her own fragility still made officers step back and temporarily be peaceful.”

Prompt for July 24 – Virtual Barat House

The brightest star in the sky is invisible

During this time of the year in the Northern Hemisphere, Sirius rises with the sun. This is why, although it’s the brightest star in the sky, we can’t see it in the summertime without technological intervention. Ancient civilizations associated the heliacal (“with the sun”) rise of Sirius with certain seasonal trends: a blessed inundation of the desert, a sinister season of heat and plague in the cities. What other superstitions or folk wisdom, real or fantastical, might be conjured from mapping invisible (heliacal or otherwise) stars and constellations?

Use the prompt to inspire your work in any form (poetry or prose; fiction of any genre; creative nonfiction, essay, or memoir).

Log into our virtual meeting at 1pm for readings and discussion.

If you prefer to post your work to our blog, visit Submittable after 12pm to upload your work. We will do our best to publish everything we receive.

Deeper dive into the prompt . . .

We derive the “Dog Days of Summer” from Sirius’s invisible season in the sky, beginning some time in July and lasting until some time in August. The Farmer’s Almanac makes July 3 to August 11 the Dog Days for 2020; in Finland this year, the Dog Days began on July 22 and will last until August 22. I mention this in case you’d like to write some more about dogs.

Prompt for July 22 – Virtual Didier Dumas

The dog ate my grief

Feel free to apply a “fill in the blank” approach to this prompt. The cat scratched my sense of humor; the frog croaked my homework. Use the prompt to inspire your work in any form (poetry or prose; fiction of any genre; creative nonfiction, essay, or memoir).

Join our virtual meeting at 8pm for readings and discussion.

If you prefer to post your work to our blog, visit Submittable after 7pm to upload your work. We will do our best to publish everything we receive.

A deeper dive into the prompt . . .

In December 2019, O, the Oprah Magazine began publishing fiction online in Sunday Shorts. In what may or may not be just a weird coincidence, three out of six stories published so far use extended animal metaphors. Laura Van Den Berg’s “The Upstairs People” and Kristen Arnett’s “Birds Surrendered and Rehomed” feature a Great Pyrenees dog and a parrot, respectively, as metaphors for loss and grief. (In Arnett’s case, I can’t help also reading the story as a wry twist on Maya Angelou’s title, “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.”) Curtis Sittenfeld’s “White Women LOL” portrays a community’s pursuit of a runaway pet and the ways in which its own shameful weaknesses elude its control. Think you might have written something that’s a good fit for the section? O, the Oprah Magazine invites story ideas and other queries at the email address on this page. Oprah and her editors don’t explicitly seek stories involving animals . . . but now that we’ve read between the lines, maybe we know better.

Prompt for July 16 – Virtual Barat House

In the night . . .

Thank you to River River writer and board member Karen Clark for the prompt, inspired by a friend’s insomnia.

Use the prompt to inspire your work in any form (poetry or prose; fiction of any genre; creative nonfiction, essay, or memoir).

Log into our virtual meeting at 1pm here: Zoom meeting

If you prefer to post your work to our blog, visit Submittable after 12pm to upload your work. We will do our best to publish everything we receive.

And just because a new comet doesn’t come along every day, here’s a picture of NEOWISE, an in-the-night phenomenon viewable above the Northwestern horizon for the next few weeks.

NEOWISE photographed by Jim Tang over Emerald Bay, California this week

Prompt for July 15 – Virtual Didier Dumas

For those times when you need to fill creative holes . . .

In the “cool tools” department, try an online “placeholder” generator to inspire your creation of new elements. These tools were developed by and for designers to easily generate dummy images in specified sizes—to fill holes, for instance.

I’ve set up this tool to give you a random 400-pixel-square image each time you click the link. If you’d like to play with other sizes or orientations, visit picsum.photos and follow the instructions.

Use the photo(s) you generate to inspire your work in any form (poetry or prose; fiction of any genre; creative nonfiction, essay, or memoir). Suggestion: choose one particular aspect of craft (character or persona, setting or landscape, narrative or emotional tone, for instance) for which the photo will be your guide.

Join our virtual meeting at 8pm for reading and discussion.

If you would like to share your work on our blog, visit Submittable after 7pm.

Prompt for July 8 – Virtual Didier Dumas

Dig out that one good moment

Rebecca Watkins, “How to Love a Bad Day”

Join our virtual meeting at 8pm for reading and discussion.

If you would like to share your work on our blog, visit Submittable after 7pm.

Prompt for July 3 – Virtual Didier Dumas

Dream Lexicon

Images you see in a dream are never what they appear to be. A dream about death is really about personal transformation; a dream about marriage is really about making a transition. Use this image generator to “dream” three unrelated things. How might they connect? Does it inspire or hinder you to imagine what those items might be interpreted to mean in a dream?

Use the prompt to inspire your work in any form (poetry or prose; fiction of any genre; creative nonfiction, essay, or memoir).

Log into our virtual meeting at 1pm here: Zoom meeting

If you prefer to post your work to our blog, visit Submittable after 12pm to upload your work. We will do our best to publish everything we receive.